Jul 292014
 


The “Ugly Smile” exhibition at Peanut Gallery is an investigation of humor with the artists expunging and exploring their base instincts, wants and needs. The exhibit is dynamic in each artist’s unique versions of humor. The artists are all very different in their use of media and the execution of their genre, and the thematic feel that connects it all makes for a solid exhibition.

Danielle Dobies’ “Throw Some Glitter, Make It Rain” hangs from the gallery wall as an elaborate creature that is part Dangerous Liaisons and part Dr. Seuss. Its materials— dacron, steel, and plastic gemstones— create a headdress of sorts, adding a complexity in texture and in her expression of humor. The plastic and wood sculpture, “I Can Feel the Weight of This World” by Jake Racina, has a self-loathing wit as a green shelf bows under the weight of a pair of discolored underwear. Its serious meditation on minimalism only makes what is going on all the more humorous and even absurd.

“Sexually Liberated Unicorn Trap” by Kara Mortensen is a watercolor with ballpoint that looks from afar to be abstract floral composition, but is really a phallus-soaked landscape of some fantastical place. Her work is very much reminiscent of the artwork of Hans Bellmer, and Mortensen seems to be the female 21st century version of the sexually-driven surrealist. It conveys humor in the overall cartoonish quality even though her technique is incredibly focused, studied and precise.

The works range from painting, to photography, to sculpture and are executed with incredible technique in dealing with concepts of sex, self-deprecation and gluttony as related to the complexity of humor and the dimensions of laughter. There is a quality of Hairy Who, Surrealism, and Dadaism in “Ugly Smile” that fits so perfectly in a space like Peanut Gallery, a cooperative establishment run by artists who know very well the top emerging artists we should all get to know.

Through Aug. 10 at Peanut Gallery, 1000 N. California Ave.

Article source: http://chicagoist.com/2014/07/28/ugly_smile_at_peanut_gallery_a_jour.php

Jul 282014
 

Doom – a different kind of shooter

The morning Inbox tries to sort fact from fiction in terms of Xbox One sales, as the argument over Oddworld: New ‘N’ Tasty pricing continues.

To join in with the discussions yourself email gamecentral@ukmetro.co.uk

 

Shoot for the past
Very happy to hear the positive reaction to the Doom reboot, even if we haven’t really seen anything on it yet. After the excellent Wolfenstein: The New Order I’ve begun to think that despite the dominance of first person shooters nowadays they have all basically morphed into the same game just with very minor variations.

Doom is nothing like modern shooters, and neither are things like GoldenEye, Perfect Dark, Turok, No One Live Forever, and Metroid Prime. I’d really like to see modern takes on these games and others. These all managed the mix between single-player and multiplayer a lot better than many modern titles, they had much more imaginative weapons, and they all had very different settings.

Not one of these are modern military, you’ve got modern spy movie, near future sci-fi, comic book dinosaur weirdness, 60s campy spy movie, and far future sci-fi. Even if they don’t make official sequels surely newer games can try and be as imaginative?
Rocko

 

The middle trilogy
I know this isn’t much of a revelation, but I decided to get Resident Evil 6 out again yesterday, to see if I could bring myself to finish it and… well, I couldn’t. It’s just awful. A terrible game and an absolutely abysmal Resident Evil. In fact I struggle to see how it counts as a Resident Evil game, especially if you remember what they used to be like. Linear, predictable, mindlessly action-based… it’s just awful.

Resident Evil 4 was praised for shaking up the formula but I wonder now if the future games go back to being real survival horror will 4, 5, and 6 be seen as the ginger stepchild of the series? The equivalent of the Star Wars prequels if the new Disney movies are good?

I’m not sure I care either way as long as they’re good but I just can’t see them pretending the action games didn’t happen and go full horror. Is there any hint as to what the new game will be or when it’ll be annouced. Maybe the Tokyo Game Show?

GC: We haven’t heard any believable rumours about Resident Evil 7. It’s a long time since anything significant has been announced at the Tokyo Game Show, but we guess it’s not impossible.

 

The passion
Bit late on this I’m afraid (I’ve been on holiday) but it was interesting to see just how unenthusiastic everyone was about the smartphone Hot Topic. Even the people that were recommending games seemed to go out of their way to mention that they were only distractions or supplements to playing ‘real’ console games.

This has become my only hope nowadays that smartphone gaming won’t completely takeover and destroy console, and particularly portable gaming. Despite things like Angry Birds having billions of downloads I’ve just never met anyone that was in anyway passionate about smartphone games. I mean how could you be? They’re purposefully made to be disposable and shallow.

My hope is that smartphones are simply the fast food of gaming and although they’re hugely popular with the masses they in no way mean that a proper restaurant will go out of business. Although they do a lot, so I guess that’s another industry that has a strong parallel with gaming.
Ishi

 

E-mail your comments to: gamecentral@ukmetro.co.uk

 

Early days
I tried to find some rough total sales for the Xbox One and PlayStation 4 but it’s pretty much impossible to get a reliable figure for either. From what I can tell though the PlayStation 4 is outselling the Xbox from anything up to 2-1.

Whatever the actual numbers are it’s a great lead. But people seem to be acting like Microsoft have dropped the ball altogether and their console is a failure.

For starters we’re only in the very early stages of the generation, so it’s impossible to know how successful either will be in a few years time. But even though it’s only sold maybe half as well as the PlayStation 4 it’s still apparently 80% more successful than the Xbox 360 was at launch. Over 6 million units (or more, who knows) is hardly a failure.

So the Xbox One has done very well really. The PlayStation 4 has done incredibly well. I’d say in the long run we’ll get a relatively even race, maybe not as even as this generation though. The PlayStation 4 will probably come out ahead but it’ll all depend on killer exclusives.

Overall though with an 80% increase over the start of the last generation we’re clearly a billion miles away from any kind of industry crash or Microsoft throwing in the towel like some people have stated over the last year.
@PjDonnelli

GC: The 80% increase is only notable if sales continue at that pace. Many consoles claim a significant lead on their predecessors, which quickly peters out after a few months. In terms of worldwide sales the ration is around 2:1 in favour of the PlayStation 4, at approximately 9 million to 5 million – with the Wii U on around 7 million. In the US though the gap is trivially narrow, while on the Continent there already seems little chance the Xbox One will ever catch up (if you also take into account their attitude towards the Xbox 360).

Where there is warranted concern about the Xbox One it’s in the fact that Microsoft has already hit a number of panic buttons and yet it seems to have made little difference. But, as you imply, that means all emphasis must now be on high quality, exclusive games. And that kind of focus can only end up being good for gamers in general, and Xbox One owners in particular.

 

Personal happiness
RE: The Bishop. I’m really glad you’re enjoying Oddworld: New ‘N’ Tasty. Although I’m more than a little disappointed with your comments towards other readers who also shared an opinion on the game.

Like the other readers I was surprised at the price point chosen for the game. It’s a large amount for a digital-only remake of a PS one game. The £11.99 point chosen by the likes of Child Of Light and Valiant Hearts would of been a much better price to entice curious buyers who may well sit it out now until it’s on sale.

You also say if gamers don’t by this one game they are no longer allowed to complain about boring sequels? But this is a remake and therefore is not even an original game. Maybe buying this game is actually telling developers that gamers are happy to pick up remakes with shiner graphics? I’m finding gamers are becoming more elitist now than ever, usually using the boring argument of Assassin’s Creed and Call Of Duty to back them up.

If you’re happy with the purchase then enjoy the game and tell others how great it is and what they are missing out on, rather than insulting readers’ opinions, which are just as justified. I look forward to playing it at the weekend, hopefully I’ll manage to get further in it than I did as a young kid.
JB316

 

Personal cost
I would just like to apologise to any readers who felt offended by my letter about Oddworld: New ‘N’ Tasty. That was not my intention, but I do feel very strongly that my central point was valid. Many gamers will complain very loudly about the lack of variety and originality in gaming, but my concern is that when push comes to shove they very rarely seem to support it when it actually happens.

The sales charts clearly show that originality does not sell and that it is the predictable and unambitious sequels which sell and the innovative and inventive ones which are ignored.

But what really upsets me is the excuses many gamers give for why they didn’t not buy a more unusual game. Price is a usual one and comes down to them literally not wanting to put their money where their mouth is. If you’re going to penny pinch over a game being £5 or so more expensive then you’d hoped then frankly you might as well give up on gaming right now.

These smaller companies aren’t some giant like EA or Ubisoft who can subsidise their games with their sure fire hits. A game like Oddworld is do or die for an indie developer: if it doesn’t sell they’ll go bust, and not only will you hear nothing more from them but it’ll also put other indies off from trying something similar again.

Supporting creativity in the games industry does come with sacrifices, and if you can’t even stretch to the cost of a pint for a game that’s trying to do things differently then, well… that explains a lot about the state of the games industry at the moment.
The Bishop

 

Last hurrah
After playing the Destiny Beta on my old, faithful Xbox 360 I have been very impressed. The aesthetics of it all are great and coupled with a lot of upgrades it looks to have a lot of longevity. I’m not quite sure how the main story campaign is going to work though. Bungie say the game could last 10 years… but surely there is no way they could string a defined campaign out for more than a few 10s of hours?

That aside, for me where the game truly came alive was in the strike mission. Me and two random allies forged an intense battle for 30+ minutes to arrive at and then defeat ‘the devil’. It was really great and a lot of fun – and like so many people have said it is Halo and Borderlands combined (all the good bits) in the combat. At times tense, at times exciting. The tempo is good, the artificial intelligence is good, the setting is good. Everything about it is enjoyable and I can’t wait to see the final game.

Furthermore, this has cemented my intentions to ‘upgrade’ to the latest console gen. However, graphics aside, it makes you wonder why games of this ambition were only released on the Xbox 360/PlayStation 3 now in their death throws, if the kit could achieve this kind of excellence the whole time! Obviously Activision’s massive support helped, but it is staggering to me the old hardware is capable of running this game so well.
Brando M83

 

Catch up on every previous Games Inbox here

 

Coin-op hero
Arcades were a big part of my early gaming years. I’ve been playing games ever since the early 80s and difference between the arcades and what you could play at home was massive all through the 80s and 90s.

At home my Spectrum 48K with eight colours and static screens was never going to compare well against what was at the arcades with their great graphics, colours and sounds. (Even later when I got a Speccy 128K+2 and then an Amiga 500+ there was still no comparison to the arcades.)

Whenever I was on holiday I would always try and find the local arcades, and one memory that sticks out was playing Crime Fighters at a tiny bar in Malta in 1989. It’s a side-scrolling multiplayer beat ‘em-up. I replayed its sequel Vendetta at last year’s Play Expo in Manchester, a great game with some real over the top Tom and Jerry style violence. Great stuff!

When the fair came to town I always made straight for the arcades with a pocket full of 10p and 20p coins. I much preferred the arcades to the rides back then.

A game that I used to play to death was Double Dragon. I sent an email to GC back in the Teletext days about completing the game at my local chippie on one 20p coin. To be fair I did spam the overpowered elbow move, and it was the version without the sliding blocks on the last level, but – even if it’s just in my head, I was a local hero for a day!

It was all about side-scrolling beat ‘em-ups for me back in the day. I don’t know if they were easier to make but there were loads of them all around during the late 80s and early 90s. To highlight a few like Splatterhouse, POW: Prisoner Of War, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, The Simpsons, Golden Axe, Final Fight. and the others I’ve mentioned above. Such great games, all with great memories of where I was when I played them.  Some of them I played on ferries when going on holiday, some at the local fair and others on days out to Blackpool and similar places.

I used to worry about growing up and wondering about how I was going to still play games when I got ‘too old for them’ As a nipper I even used to imagine that I’d be this ancient 80-year-old man still going to arcades to play games, and feeling totally out of place. I never thought that other gamers would grow old too and still keep playing – I thought I’d be the only one who’d refused to ‘grow up’ and find a more suitable pastime!

Thankfully I didn’t grow up and computer games are still a big part of how I like to spend my time. I don’t get as much time on them as I’d like, what with family and work and all that stuff, but I get on one of our home consoles when I can. I don’t know the exact time when the quality of gaming at home overtook arcades and made them obsolete, but I was a good few years ago. Arcades were a massive part of mine and probably a lot of other GC readers formative years but don’t despair – they haven’t gone away, think of it like this: there’s now an arcade in everyone’s home.
skipsville 1977 (gamertag)/dadisawesome77 (NN ID)

 

Inbox also-rans
I do wish someone would explain to Square Enix that the terrible names are basically ensuring that Final Fantasy is never mainstream. I mean, what is Dissidia and Type-0 meant to mean to the average person? Other than ‘weird niche game that clearly isn’t for me because I’m not part of the crowd that can even understand what its name means’.
Spencer

RE: arcades. Just go to Barry Island…
Neil

 

This week’s Hot Topic
The subject for this weekend’s Inbox was suggested by reader Joe90, who asks what’s the most famous video game franchise you’ve never played?

In the style of TV show I’ve Never Seen Star Wars, what well-known game have you never played and why? Is there a long-running series that you’ve never played a single example of and how have you managed to avoid it for so long?

Have you purposefully ignored the game because you don’t think you’d like it? Is it because you’ve never owned the necessary console or is there some other more complicated reason? Have you played any other similar games and what do you think of them? Do you regret not playing the game in question and are there any games that you’ve also not played for a long time, but did eventually get around to?

E-mail your comments to: gamecentral@ukmetro.co.uk

 

The small print
New Inbox updates appear twice daily, every weekday morning and afternoon. Letters are used on merit and may be edited for length.

You can also submit your own 500 to 600-word 4Player viewer features at any time, which if used will be shown in the next available weekend slot.

If you need quick access to the GameCentral channel page please use www.metro.co.uk/games and don’t forget to follow us on Twitter.

Article source: http://metro.co.uk/2014/07/28/games-inbox-doom-reboot-resident-evil-7-reveal-and-destiny-beta-praise-4812413/

Jul 282014
 

Doom – a different kind of shooter

The morning Inbox tries to sort fact from fiction in terms of Xbox One sales, as the argument over Oddworld: New ‘N’ Tasty pricing continues.

To join in with the discussions yourself email gamecentral@ukmetro.co.uk

 

Shoot for the past
Very happy to hear the positive reaction to the Doom reboot, even if we haven’t really seen anything on it yet. After the excellent Wolfenstein: The New Order I’ve begun to think that despite the dominance of first person shooters nowadays they have all basically morphed into the same game just with very minor variations.

Doom is nothing like modern shooters, and neither are things like GoldenEye, Perfect Dark, Turok, No One Live Forever, and Metroid Prime. I’d really like to see modern takes on these games and others. These all managed the mix between single-player and multiplayer a lot better than many modern titles, they had much more imaginative weapons, and they all had very different settings.

Not one of these are modern military, you’ve got modern spy movie, near future sci-fi, comic book dinosaur weirdness, 60s campy spy movie, and far future sci-fi. Even if they don’t make official sequels surely newer games can try and be as imaginative?
Rocko

 

The middle trilogy
I know this isn’t much of a revelation, but I decided to get Resident Evil 6 out again yesterday, to see if I could bring myself to finish it and… well, I couldn’t. It’s just awful. A terrible game and an absolutely abysmal Resident Evil. In fact I struggle to see how it counts as a Resident Evil game, especially if you remember what they used to be like. Linear, predictable, mindlessly action-based… it’s just awful.

Resident Evil 4 was praised for shaking up the formula but I wonder now if the future games go back to being real survival horror will 4, 5, and 6 be seen as the ginger stepchild of the series? The equivalent of the Star Wars prequels if the new Disney movies are good?

I’m not sure I care either way as long as they’re good but I just can’t see them pretending the action games didn’t happen and go full horror. Is there any hint as to what the new game will be or when it’ll be annouced. Maybe the Tokyo Game Show?

GC: We haven’t heard any believable rumours about Resident Evil 7. It’s a long time since anything significant has been announced at the Tokyo Game Show, but we guess it’s not impossible.

 

The passion
Bit late on this I’m afraid (I’ve been on holiday) but it was interesting to see just how unenthusiastic everyone was about the smartphone Hot Topic. Even the people that were recommending games seemed to go out of their way to mention that they were only distractions or supplements to playing ‘real’ console games.

This has become my only hope nowadays that smartphone gaming won’t completely takeover and destroy console, and particularly portable gaming. Despite things like Angry Birds having billions of downloads I’ve just never met anyone that was in anyway passionate about smartphone games. I mean how could you be? They’re purposefully made to be disposable and shallow.

My hope is that smartphones are simply the fast food of gaming and although they’re hugely popular with the masses they in no way mean that a proper restaurant will go out of business. Although they do a lot, so I guess that’s another industry that has a strong parallel with gaming.
Ishi

 

E-mail your comments to: gamecentral@ukmetro.co.uk

 

Early days
I tried to find some rough total sales for the Xbox One and PlayStation 4 but it’s pretty much impossible to get a reliable figure for either. From what I can tell though the PlayStation 4 is outselling the Xbox from anything up to 2-1.

Whatever the actual numbers are it’s a great lead. But people seem to be acting like Microsoft have dropped the ball altogether and their console is a failure.

For starters we’re only in the very early stages of the generation, so it’s impossible to know how successful either will be in a few years time. But even though it’s only sold maybe half as well as the PlayStation 4 it’s still apparently 80% more successful than the Xbox 360 was at launch. Over 6 million units (or more, who knows) is hardly a failure.

So the Xbox One has done very well really. The PlayStation 4 has done incredibly well. I’d say in the long run we’ll get a relatively even race, maybe not as even as this generation though. The PlayStation 4 will probably come out ahead but it’ll all depend on killer exclusives.

Overall though with an 80% increase over the start of the last generation we’re clearly a billion miles away from any kind of industry crash or Microsoft throwing in the towel like some people have stated over the last year.
@PjDonnelli

GC: The 80% increase is only notable if sales continue at that pace. Many consoles claim a significant lead on their predecessors, which quickly peters out after a few months. In terms of worldwide sales the ration is around 2:1 in favour of the PlayStation 4, at approximately 9 million to 5 million – with the Wii U on around 7 million. In the US though the gap is trivially narrow, while on the Continent there already seems little chance the Xbox One will ever catch up (if you also take into account their attitude towards the Xbox 360).

Where there is warranted concern about the Xbox One it’s in the fact that Microsoft has already hit a number of panic buttons and yet it seems to have made little difference. But, as you imply, that means all emphasis must now be on high quality, exclusive games. And that kind of focus can only end up being good for gamers in general, and Xbox One owners in particular.

 

Personal happiness
RE: The Bishop. I’m really glad you’re enjoying Oddworld: New ‘N’ Tasty. Although I’m more than a little disappointed with your comments towards other readers who also shared an opinion on the game.

Like the other readers I was surprised at the price point chosen for the game. It’s a large amount for a digital-only remake of a PS one game. The £11.99 point chosen by the likes of Child Of Light and Valiant Hearts would of been a much better price to entice curious buyers who may well sit it out now until it’s on sale.

You also say if gamers don’t by this one game they are no longer allowed to complain about boring sequels? But this is a remake and therefore is not even an original game. Maybe buying this game is actually telling developers that gamers are happy to pick up remakes with shiner graphics? I’m finding gamers are becoming more elitist now than ever, usually using the boring argument of Assassin’s Creed and Call Of Duty to back them up.

If you’re happy with the purchase then enjoy the game and tell others how great it is and what they are missing out on, rather than insulting readers’ opinions, which are just as justified. I look forward to playing it at the weekend, hopefully I’ll manage to get further in it than I did as a young kid.
JB316

 

Personal cost
I would just like to apologise to any readers who felt offended by my letter about Oddworld: New ‘N’ Tasty. That was not my intention, but I do feel very strongly that my central point was valid. Many gamers will complain very loudly about the lack of variety and originality in gaming, but my concern is that when push comes to shove they very rarely seem to support it when it actually happens.

The sales charts clearly show that originality does not sell and that it is the predictable and unambitious sequels which sell and the innovative and inventive ones which are ignored.

But what really upsets me is the excuses many gamers give for why they didn’t not buy a more unusual game. Price is a usual one and comes down to them literally not wanting to put their money where their mouth is. If you’re going to penny pinch over a game being £5 or so more expensive then you’d hoped then frankly you might as well give up on gaming right now.

These smaller companies aren’t some giant like EA or Ubisoft who can subsidise their games with their sure fire hits. A game like Oddworld is do or die for an indie developer: if it doesn’t sell they’ll go bust, and not only will you hear nothing more from them but it’ll also put other indies off from trying something similar again.

Supporting creativity in the games industry does come with sacrifices, and if you can’t even stretch to the cost of a pint for a game that’s trying to do things differently then, well… that explains a lot about the state of the games industry at the moment.
The Bishop

 

Last hurrah
After playing the Destiny Beta on my old, faithful Xbox 360 I have been very impressed. The aesthetics of it all are great and coupled with a lot of upgrades it looks to have a lot of longevity. I’m not quite sure how the main story campaign is going to work though. Bungie say the game could last 10 years… but surely there is no way they could string a defined campaign out for more than a few 10s of hours?

That aside, for me where the game truly came alive was in the strike mission. Me and two random allies forged an intense battle for 30+ minutes to arrive at and then defeat ‘the devil’. It was really great and a lot of fun – and like so many people have said it is Halo and Borderlands combined (all the good bits) in the combat. At times tense, at times exciting. The tempo is good, the artificial intelligence is good, the setting is good. Everything about it is enjoyable and I can’t wait to see the final game.

Furthermore, this has cemented my intentions to ‘upgrade’ to the latest console gen. However, graphics aside, it makes you wonder why games of this ambition were only released on the Xbox 360/PlayStation 3 now in their death throws, if the kit could achieve this kind of excellence the whole time! Obviously Activision’s massive support helped, but it is staggering to me the old hardware is capable of running this game so well.
Brando M83

 

Catch up on every previous Games Inbox here

 

Coin-op hero
Arcades were a big part of my early gaming years. I’ve been playing games ever since the early 80s and difference between the arcades and what you could play at home was massive all through the 80s and 90s.

At home my Spectrum 48K with eight colours and static screens was never going to compare well against what was at the arcades with their great graphics, colours and sounds. (Even later when I got a Speccy 128K+2 and then an Amiga 500+ there was still no comparison to the arcades.)

Whenever I was on holiday I would always try and find the local arcades, and one memory that sticks out was playing Crime Fighters at a tiny bar in Malta in 1989. It’s a side-scrolling multiplayer beat ‘em-up. I replayed its sequel Vendetta at last year’s Play Expo in Manchester, a great game with some real over the top Tom and Jerry style violence. Great stuff!

When the fair came to town I always made straight for the arcades with a pocket full of 10p and 20p coins. I much preferred the arcades to the rides back then.

A game that I used to play to death was Double Dragon. I sent an email to GC back in the Teletext days about completing the game at my local chippie on one 20p coin. To be fair I did spam the overpowered elbow move, and it was the version without the sliding blocks on the last level, but – even if it’s just in my head, I was a local hero for a day!

It was all about side-scrolling beat ‘em-ups for me back in the day. I don’t know if they were easier to make but there were loads of them all around during the late 80s and early 90s. To highlight a few like Splatterhouse, POW: Prisoner Of War, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, The Simpsons, Golden Axe, Final Fight. and the others I’ve mentioned above. Such great games, all with great memories of where I was when I played them.  Some of them I played on ferries when going on holiday, some at the local fair and others on days out to Blackpool and similar places.

I used to worry about growing up and wondering about how I was going to still play games when I got ‘too old for them’ As a nipper I even used to imagine that I’d be this ancient 80-year-old man still going to arcades to play games, and feeling totally out of place. I never thought that other gamers would grow old too and still keep playing – I thought I’d be the only one who’d refused to ‘grow up’ and find a more suitable pastime!

Thankfully I didn’t grow up and computer games are still a big part of how I like to spend my time. I don’t get as much time on them as I’d like, what with family and work and all that stuff, but I get on one of our home consoles when I can. I don’t know the exact time when the quality of gaming at home overtook arcades and made them obsolete, but I was a good few years ago. Arcades were a massive part of mine and probably a lot of other GC readers formative years but don’t despair – they haven’t gone away, think of it like this: there’s now an arcade in everyone’s home.
skipsville 1977 (gamertag)/dadisawesome77 (NN ID)

 

Inbox also-rans
I do wish someone would explain to Square Enix that the terrible names are basically ensuring that Final Fantasy is never mainstream. I mean, what is Dissidia and Type-0 meant to mean to the average person? Other than ‘weird niche game that clearly isn’t for me because I’m not part of the crowd that can even understand what its name means’.
Spencer

RE: arcades. Just go to Barry Island…
Neil

 

This week’s Hot Topic
The subject for this weekend’s Inbox was suggested by reader Joe90, who asks what’s the most famous video game franchise you’ve never played?

In the style of TV show I’ve Never Seen Star Wars, what well-known game have you never played and why? Is there a long-running series that you’ve never played a single example of and how have you managed to avoid it for so long?

Have you purposefully ignored the game because you don’t think you’d like it? Is it because you’ve never owned the necessary console or is there some other more complicated reason? Have you played any other similar games and what do you think of them? Do you regret not playing the game in question and are there any games that you’ve also not played for a long time, but did eventually get around to?

E-mail your comments to: gamecentral@ukmetro.co.uk

 

The small print
New Inbox updates appear twice daily, every weekday morning and afternoon. Letters are used on merit and may be edited for length.

You can also submit your own 500 to 600-word 4Player viewer features at any time, which if used will be shown in the next available weekend slot.

If you need quick access to the GameCentral channel page please use www.metro.co.uk/games and don’t forget to follow us on Twitter.

Article source: http://metro.co.uk/2014/07/28/games-inbox-doom-reboot-resident-evil-7-reveal-and-destiny-beta-praise-4812413/

Jul 282014
 

In the cauldron of Scottish football an almighty Hampden roar sounded for a young English sprinter, Adam Gemili, who until three years ago dreamed of kicking a ball for a living but now has a 100m silver medal to celebrate. No wonder he clasped hands to head in wide-eyed exuberance.

But the understated reaction of the winner, Kemar Bailey-Cole, was just as telling. He had expected to win, and win he did. Despite the absence of Usain Bolt and his long-time frenemy Yohan Blake from the Commonwealth Games’ blue riband event, one thing holds true: the production line of Jamaican sprinters keeps rolling.

Bailey-Cole had a stumbling start and was a metre or so behind Gemili early on. But he picked up to cruise home in a season’s best 10.00sec, with Gemili second in 10.10 and another Jamaican, Nickel Ashmeade, third in 10.12.

“I’m speechless,” admitted Gemili. “The reception I received was amazing. It gave me goosebumps and the extra energy to hold on despite tired legs.”

The 20-year-old’s medal was a minor surprise, given his personal best is 10.04 and there were several men in the competition who had gone under 10 seconds. But it was only a matter of time for the good vibrations, which have been growing ever since Gemili decided to switch from semi-professional football with Dagenham Redbridge to athletics in 2011, to be realised.

Two years ago, as a callow 18-year-old, he just missed out on the 100m final at the London Olympics after running 10.06sec. Last year he became only the second British athlete – after John Regis – to crash through the 20-second barrier for 200m, before finishing fifth in the world championship final in Moscow. Now at last he has a medal.

And he intends to build quickly on his achievements. “The times will come,” said Gemili. “But medals are what counts and this is just a stepping stone for the European Championships in a couple of weeks’ time and then the world championships next year and Rio in 2016.”

As Gemili wallowed in his personal triumph, Bailey-Cole was more laconic. “The start, it wasn’t good,” he sighed. “The rest was OK.”

Bailey-Cole is coached by Glenn Mills, who also trains Bolt at Kingston’s famous Racers Track Club, and the parallels between the two sprinters are obvious. Both are tall – Bailey Cole is 1.93m, Bolt two centimetres bigger – and both combine a loping stride that allows them to eat up the track, with a zen-like relaxation which means they do not tighten up while others’ legs go wobbly.

Last year Bolt talked up the chances of Bailey-Cole one day eclipsing his feats, and this was a not insignificant marker. But he lacks Bolt’s showmanship and, interestingly, Bailey-Cole admits the pair are not best buddies. “I train with Usain but the friendship is not that close,”he said. “I didn’t hear from him beforehand.”

He was also less than complimentary when asked to compare his Glasgow experience with that of London 2012. “I can’t compare them,” he said. “London was really different food. It was way better than this. Scottish food could do with some more seasoning.”

Earlier, as the sun set on Glasgow, Blessing Okagbare, the Nigerian who dyed her hair gold for these Commonwealth Games, proved her confidence was not misplaced when she won her first major championship title in the women’s 100m in a Commonwealth Games record.

The 25-year-old ran 10.85sec – the second fastest time in the world this year – to beat the Jamaicans Veronica Campbell-Brown and Kerron Stewart, who ran 11.03 and 11.07 respectively. Britain’s Asha Philip ran a personal best but agonisingly finished fourth in 11.18, while Bianca Williams was sixth in 11.31.

Okagbare began to long jump aged 15 but switched to sprinting at 21 after her coached persuaded her to give it a go when she ran her first 100m in 11.21sec. “I wanted to put on a show,” said Okagbare. “It was about execution and staying patient – after 70m it just felt easy.”

In the women’s hammer, England’s Sophie Hitchon was only moderately happy to claim bronze with a throw of 68.72m, a distance over four metres below her personal best.

Hitchon, a former ballet dancer who has two pet rats named Sid and Roddy, came into the Games believing she was in the form to challenge for gold. But the 23-year-old had to settle for third behind the Canadian Sultana Frizell, who retained her title from Delhi with a Games record throw of 71.97, while New Zealand’s Julia Ratcliffe claimed silver.

Hitchon said: “The first few rounds were a little jerky and I only got it together later on. That is what happens sometimes. I am amazingly pleased with a medal but I just always want the very best as an athlete.”

On Tuesday morning the action continues with the Olympic 800m champion and world-record holder, David Rudisha, starting his campaign, while the London 2012 long jump champion, Greg Rutherford, resumes his often testy rivalry with Chris Tomlinson as the pair attempt to qualify for Wednesday’s final.

The evening’s action centres on Scotland’s fast-improving Laura Muir taking on England’s Laura Weightman and the Kenyan favourite, Hellen Obiri, in the women’s 1500m.

It should be some race. But unless Muir can conjure up a moment of high delirium in front of her home crowd, the atmosphere will struggle to match the sonic boom and fulsome exultations for Gemili on a night when he gave yet another shining display of his potential.

Article source: http://www.theguardian.com/sport/2014/jul/28/commonwealth-games-2014-kemar-bailey-cole-100m-jamaica

Jul 282014
 

In the cauldron of Scottish football an almighty Hampden roar sounded for a young English sprinter, Adam Gemili, who until three years ago dreamed of kicking a ball for a living but now has a 100m silver medal to celebrate. No wonder he clasped hands to head in wide-eyed exuberance.

But the understated reaction of the winner, Kemar Bailey-Cole, was just as telling. He had expected to win, and win he did. Despite the absence of Usain Bolt and his long-time frenemy Yohan Blake from the Commonwealth Games’ blue riband event, one thing holds true: the production line of Jamaican sprinters keeps rolling.

Bailey-Cole had a stumbling start and was a metre or so behind Gemili early on. But he picked up to cruise home in a season’s best 10.00sec, with Gemili second in 10.10 and another Jamaican, Nickel Ashmeade, third in 10.12.

“I’m speechless,” admitted Gemili. “The reception I received was amazing. It gave me goosebumps and the extra energy to hold on despite tired legs.”

The 20-year-old’s medal was a minor surprise, given his personal best is 10.04 and there were several men in the competition who had gone under 10 seconds. But it was only a matter of time for the good vibrations, which have been growing ever since Gemili decided to switch from semi-professional football with Dagenham Redbridge to athletics in 2011, to be realised.

Two years ago, as a callow 18-year-old, he just missed out on the 100m final at the London Olympics after running 10.06sec. Last year he became only the second British athlete – after John Regis – to crash through the 20-second barrier for 200m, before finishing fifth in the world championship final in Moscow. Now at last he has a medal.

And he intends to build quickly on his achievements. “The times will come,” said Gemili. “But medals are what counts and this is just a stepping stone for the European Championships in a couple of weeks’ time and then the world championships next year and Rio in 2016.”

As Gemili wallowed in his personal triumph, Bailey-Cole was more laconic. “The start, it wasn’t good,” he sighed. “The rest was OK.”

Bailey-Cole is coached by Glenn Mills, who also trains Bolt at Kingston’s famous Racers Track Club, and the parallels between the two sprinters are obvious. Both are tall – Bailey Cole is 1.93m, Bolt two centimetres bigger – and both combine a loping stride that allows them to eat up the track, with a zen-like relaxation which means they do not tighten up while others’ legs go wobbly.

Last year Bolt talked up the chances of Bailey-Cole one day eclipsing his feats, and this was a not insignificant marker. But he lacks Bolt’s showmanship and, interestingly, Bailey-Cole admits the pair are not best buddies. “I train with Usain but the friendship is not that close,”he said. “I didn’t hear from him beforehand.”

He was also less than complimentary when asked to compare his Glasgow experience with that of London 2012. “I can’t compare them,” he said. “London was really different food. It was way better than this. Scottish food could do with some more seasoning.”

Earlier, as the sun set on Glasgow, Blessing Okagbare, the Nigerian who dyed her hair gold for these Commonwealth Games, proved her confidence was not misplaced when she won her first major championship title in the women’s 100m in a Commonwealth Games record.

The 25-year-old ran 10.85sec – the second fastest time in the world this year – to beat the Jamaicans Veronica Campbell-Brown and Kerron Stewart, who ran 11.03 and 11.07 respectively. Britain’s Asha Philip ran a personal best but agonisingly finished fourth in 11.18, while Bianca Williams was sixth in 11.31.

Okagbare began to long jump aged 15 but switched to sprinting at 21 after her coached persuaded her to give it a go when she ran her first 100m in 11.21sec. “I wanted to put on a show,” said Okagbare. “It was about execution and staying patient – after 70m it just felt easy.”

In the women’s hammer, England’s Sophie Hitchon was only moderately happy to claim bronze with a throw of 68.72m, a distance over four metres below her personal best.

Hitchon, a former ballet dancer who has two pet rats named Sid and Roddy, came into the Games believing she was in the form to challenge for gold. But the 23-year-old had to settle for third behind the Canadian Sultana Frizell, who retained her title from Delhi with a Games record throw of 71.97, while New Zealand’s Julia Ratcliffe claimed silver.

Hitchon said: “The first few rounds were a little jerky and I only got it together later on. That is what happens sometimes. I am amazingly pleased with a medal but I just always want the very best as an athlete.”

On Tuesday morning the action continues with the Olympic 800m champion and world-record holder, David Rudisha, starting his campaign, while the London 2012 long jump champion, Greg Rutherford, resumes his often testy rivalry with Chris Tomlinson as the pair attempt to qualify for Wednesday’s final.

The evening’s action centres on Scotland’s fast-improving Laura Muir taking on England’s Laura Weightman and the Kenyan favourite, Hellen Obiri, in the women’s 1500m.

It should be some race. But unless Muir can conjure up a moment of high delirium in front of her home crowd, the atmosphere will struggle to match the sonic boom and fulsome exultations for Gemili on a night when he gave yet another shining display of his potential.

Article source: http://www.theguardian.com/sport/2014/jul/28/commonwealth-games-2014-kemar-bailey-cole-100m-jamaica

Jul 282014
 

Derrick Rose hopes his critics are hungry, because he plans on stuffing their mouths with hefty helpings of defiance.

While unveiling the Adidas D Rose 5, the Chicago Bulls point guard was his usual confident, unflappable, non-believers-can-bite-me self, per SLAM: 

Well, now. It’s almost like Rose isn’t one to doubt himself or something.

Rejecting unsavory expectations has become a ritual for the 25-year-old who has appeared in just 50 games—regular season and playoffs—since 2011-12. Last fall, when he was still working his way back from an ACL injury, talk centered on him being better than ever.

Ten 2013-14 appearances weren’t enough to prove himself better than before, but the spirit of his return is identical this time around. Rose doesn’t view himself as a liability or even injury-prone. He’s an elite point guard on the precipice of distancing himself from a protracted string of bad luck in his mind.

The Bulls can only hope his matter-of-fact bravado holds merit.

Making significant roster upgrades—signing Pau Gasol and drafting Doug McDermott, for starters—isn’t enough. The Bulls, like Pippen Ain’t Easy’s Daniel Attias makes clear, still need Rose to be Rose if they’re to contend for an NBA title:

After a torn ACL and meniscus in consecutive seasons, numerous doubts have surfaced regarding the possibility that the former MVP ever regains the same explosive form of 2010-11 but it’s not that level of play that Chicago needs to succeed. What they do need, however, is for Rose to be a consistent performer and to stay healthy. His ability to get into the lane will be paramount to the Bulls chances next season and the team’s newest signings will be the ones who could benefit mostly from it.

Coach Tom Thibodeau and his throng of resilient troops are more than capable of surviving without Rose. Adding an accomplished performer and two-time champion like Gasol only takes pressure off the floor general’s return. 

But Rose isn’t an on-court accessory.

If he goes down again, the Bulls will have to move forward knowing he’ll never be the same. Until his body proves otherwise, though, their title hopes are still firmly fixed to his performance and health, the first of which isn’t too much of an issue.


Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images

Ability has never been Rose’s problem. During his brief 10-game return, he was rusty, but there were traces of explosion and a willingness to adapt his game to any potential physical limitations.

Availability remains Rose’s greatest obstacle. When he’s healthy and playing without restrictions, he’s still a superstar—the same superstar who won league MVP in 2010-11. It’s all about getting him back to that point, where constraints aren’t being placed upon his availability.

Team USA coach Mike Krzyzewski—who will oversee Rose as he (hopefully) participates in this summer’s World Cup—thinks he’s already there, per Yahoo Sports’ Marc J. Spears:

He was our starting guard in 2010. I met with him a little bit yesterday. I know he’s excited about being here. Physically, he’s good. It’s just a matter of how quickly you regain the instincts to compete and play at this level. …

… He says he’s ready to go. I haven’t seen him play. These next few days I will see the new guys, see Derrick. We put in part of our foundation for this system, but we have to give them the opportunity to play. The Select Team gives us an opportunity to compete and play more than just practice against each other.

No matter how ready Rose says he is, regaining his previous form—and possibly exceeding it—is going to take time, take patience. He won’t shut his critics up overnight.

It will take more than a year of sustained execution that shows Rose is still Rose, his contributions just as reliable, his future just as bright.

In the meantime, he can start the hater-hushing stepping stone by stepping stone, performance by performance, forcibly fed word by forcibly fed word.

 

Article source: http://bleacherreport.com/articles/2143691-derrick-rose-its-gonna-be-funny-watching-doubters-eat-their-words

Jul 282014
 

Derrick Rose hopes his critics are hungry, because he plans on stuffing their mouths with hefty helpings of defiance.

While unveiling the Adidas D Rose 5, the Chicago Bulls point guard was his usual confident, unflappable, non-believers-can-bite-me self, per SLAM: 

Well, now. It’s almost like Rose isn’t one to doubt himself or something.

Rejecting unsavory expectations has become a ritual for the 25-year-old who has appeared in just 50 games—regular season and playoffs—since 2011-12. Last fall, when he was still working his way back from an ACL injury, talk centered on him being better than ever.

Ten 2013-14 appearances weren’t enough to prove himself better than before, but the spirit of his return is identical this time around. Rose doesn’t view himself as a liability or even injury-prone. He’s an elite point guard on the precipice of distancing himself from a protracted string of bad luck in his mind.

The Bulls can only hope his matter-of-fact bravado holds merit.

Making significant roster upgrades—signing Pau Gasol and drafting Doug McDermott, for starters—isn’t enough. The Bulls, like Pippen Ain’t Easy’s Daniel Attias makes clear, still need Rose to be Rose if they’re to contend for an NBA title:

After a torn ACL and meniscus in consecutive seasons, numerous doubts have surfaced regarding the possibility that the former MVP ever regains the same explosive form of 2010-11 but it’s not that level of play that Chicago needs to succeed. What they do need, however, is for Rose to be a consistent performer and to stay healthy. His ability to get into the lane will be paramount to the Bulls chances next season and the team’s newest signings will be the ones who could benefit mostly from it.

Coach Tom Thibodeau and his throng of resilient troops are more than capable of surviving without Rose. Adding an accomplished performer and two-time champion like Gasol only takes pressure off the floor general’s return. 

But Rose isn’t an on-court accessory.

If he goes down again, the Bulls will have to move forward knowing he’ll never be the same. Until his body proves otherwise, though, their title hopes are still firmly fixed to his performance and health, the first of which isn’t too much of an issue.


Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images

Ability has never been Rose’s problem. During his brief 10-game return, he was rusty, but there were traces of explosion and a willingness to adapt his game to any potential physical limitations.

Availability remains Rose’s greatest obstacle. When he’s healthy and playing without restrictions, he’s still a superstar—the same superstar who won league MVP in 2010-11. It’s all about getting him back to that point, where constraints aren’t being placed upon his availability.

Team USA coach Mike Krzyzewski—who will oversee Rose as he (hopefully) participates in this summer’s World Cup—thinks he’s already there, per Yahoo Sports’ Marc J. Spears:

He was our starting guard in 2010. I met with him a little bit yesterday. I know he’s excited about being here. Physically, he’s good. It’s just a matter of how quickly you regain the instincts to compete and play at this level. …

… He says he’s ready to go. I haven’t seen him play. These next few days I will see the new guys, see Derrick. We put in part of our foundation for this system, but we have to give them the opportunity to play. The Select Team gives us an opportunity to compete and play more than just practice against each other.

No matter how ready Rose says he is, regaining his previous form—and possibly exceeding it—is going to take time, take patience. He won’t shut his critics up overnight.

It will take more than a year of sustained execution that shows Rose is still Rose, his contributions just as reliable, his future just as bright.

In the meantime, he can start the hater-hushing stepping stone by stepping stone, performance by performance, forcibly fed word by forcibly fed word.

 

Article source: http://bleacherreport.com/articles/2143691-derrick-rose-its-gonna-be-funny-watching-doubters-eat-their-words

Jul 282014
 

COOPERSTOWN, N.Y. — While serving as his teammate in Atlanta, Tom Glavine watched Greg Maddux prepare for more than 350 starts, many of which took place in the midst of the pressure-packed postseason. But Glavine said he had never seen Maddux nervous until Sunday afternoon, when they sat in front of approximately 50,000 folks who came to Cooperstown to watch this year’s Hall of Fame induction speeches.

“That was the first speech I’ve really ever given,” Maddux said afterward. “I was kind of not sure what to expect. I actually really enjoyed writing it, because it made me think about where I started and how I got to this point, and about all of the people that helped me along the way.”

Maddux had the good fortune to have two of those individuals — Glavine and Bobby Cox — sitting next to him, soaking in the glory of experiencing the same ultimate honor on Sunday. The three former Braves also shared the stage with Frank Thomas, Joe Torre and Tony La Russa, who rounded out this year’s impressive induction class.

“I’ve never seen Mad Dog smile so much,” said Cox, who managed Maddux in Atlanta from 1993-2003. “We got [to Cooperstown] on Wednesday night. He was smiling then, and he was smiling right up to the point today when he walked right up to the microphone.”

Along with providing genuine appreciation for the countless folks that helped him develop into one of the greatest pitchers in baseball history, Maddux also managed to keep things light with his unique wit, which led many of his former teammates to use “gross” as a word to describe him.

Unfortunately, Mike Maddux, the Rangers’ pitching coach, was reminded of his younger brother’s knack to compliment and embarrass within the same thought.

“My brother Mike led by example,” Greg Maddux said. “Everything I was about to do on and off the field, he had already done. I was very fortunate to have a brother to learn from. He even taught me about science. It has to do with a little methane and a lighter, and I still get a huge kick out of it today. That’s funny.”

While Maddux might not end up being the last 355-game winner to enter the Hall of Fame, he certainly seems destined to be the only man to reference igniting flatulence during an induction speech.

But this was genuine Maddux, who spent more than 20 Major League seasons entertaining teammates with uncanny precision on the mound and an ornery persona that kept things light in the clubhouse.

When it came time for Maddux to thank Eddie Perez, Paul Bako, Damon Berryhill, Henry Blanco and the others who served as his catcher, he said, “I used to get a nice chuckle when they got hit in the face by foul tips.” Those men who had the pleasure to catch him knew there was never any malicious nature to the fact that he found some humor in the routine foul tip jarring a catcher’s mask.

At 48 years old, Maddux still has some of that youthful persona he possessed when the Cubs selected him in the second round of the 1984 First-Year Player Draft. He has spent the 30 years that have followed benefiting from the many men who provided the guidance that eventually led to four consecutive National League Cy Young Awards and the eighth-most wins of all-time, the second most among those who pitched after 1930.

Maddux credited the foundation of his pitching skills to the opportunity he had to be introduced to Ralph Meder, a longtime baseball coach who helped youth players in Las Vegas. Meder was the first to stress to a 14-year-old Maddux that location and movement would trump velocity as he got older.

“[Former Cubs pitching coach] Billy Connors asked, ‘Do you ever wonder how good you can be?’” Maddux said. “Of course, I said, ‘No.’ He said, ‘Why don’t you go out there and find out?’ I’ve been trying to find the answer to that question every day since.”

During his days with the Cubs, Maddux was introduced to current Brewers pitching coach Rick Kranitz, who helped him develop his changeup; Jim Wright, who stressed the importance of locating on both sides of the plate; and Dick Pole, who focused on the development of a consistent delivery and sound pitch selection.

Maddux also credited former Cubs manager Don Zimmer for teaching him “there is a difference between winning and pitching just good enough to lose.”

Given that Maddux has been described as one of the most cerebral hurlers in baseball history, it might not be surprising that he described sports psychologist Harvey Dorfman as “one of the best coaches I’ve ever had.”

By the time Maddux arrived in Atlanta before the start of the 1993 season, he had already won the first of his four consecutive Cy Young Awards. Still, he appreciated the passion possessed by his longtime Braves pitching coach, Leo Mazzone, and the winning culture that Cox created and procured for more than two decades.

Like Glavine, Maddux also took time to credit longtime Braves physician Dr. Joe Chandler, who provided the care necessary for the two Hall of Famers to pitch 10 consecutive seasons together and combine for just one disabled list stint in the process.

“Bobby taught us how to play winning baseball, and enjoy our time away from the park,” Maddux said. “Thank God, David Justice hit that big home run when he did, and Glav threw one more clutch game.”

Justice’s home run and Glavine’s clutch performance in Game 6 of the 1995 World Series gave Maddux what he considers to be his greatest accomplishment — his only World Series championship. He spent seven more seasons in Atlanta developing brotherly bonds with Glavine and John Smoltz, who might become a first-ballot Hall of Famer next year.

“The next seven years was spent winning division titles, watching the kids grow up and watching John Smoltz’s hairline recede,” Maddux said, while providing yet another chance to laugh during Sunday’s speech.

Once Maddux exited Atlanta after the 2003 season, he returned to the Cubs, where he developed a close friendship with general manager Jim Hendry, who was present for this weekend’s events. He then ended his career closer to his Las Vegas home while enjoying stints with the Padres and Dodgers.

“I learned more about throwing the changeup a better way from [Padres pitching coach] Darren Balsley,” Maddux said. “That was 24 years after learning from Rick Kranitz. That just goes to show you that no matter how old you are, you’re still looking to get better.”

Mission accomplished for Maddux and the many who helped him do so.

“It’s sort of hard to believe I’m standing here today,” Maddux said. “I never gave a thought about the Hall of Fame as I was going through my career. My goal as a baseball player was very simple: All I wanted to do was try to get better for my next start. To think it all ended up here is pretty cool.”

Article source: http://mlb.mlb.com/news/article/mlb/greg-madduxs-hall-of-fame-speech-filled-with-gratitude-humor?ymd=20140727&content_id=86580728&vkey=news_mlb

Jul 272014
 

Sam Smith is a 12-year-old game developer. That’s rather young, sure, but that’s not even the strangest part.

Sam makes games instead of going to school.

Spacepants is Sam’s latest game, available for $1 on iOS and Android devices. It’s a brutally tough “endless runner” — like Jetpack Joyride or Flappy Bird — set in a single room, which sees you avoiding lasers, space caterpillars, and other nasties for as long as you can while constantly moving.

My Spacepants record was 75.73 seconds when I spoke to Sam last week — although I’ve beaten it since — and he seemed reasonably impressed with my efforts. “It’s above average,” he told me enthusiastically, before sharing some background on his journey into game development.

Making Spacepants

Sam has been making games from his home in the south of England for “about a year.” He started out playing around with a programming language called Small Basic, a simplified version of Visual Basic, mostly making text-based adventures that are all words and no graphics.

It was Sam’s dad who introduced him to GameMaker: Studio, the creative resource suitable for programming novices that Sam used to build Spacepants. “He’s a programmer himself,” Sam told me. “He actually introduced me to how to make a game and how to read the [Game Maker] manual.”

As with many great ideas, Spacepants started out with a simple concept. “I wanted to make a game where you could walk up walls because walking up walls is fun,” said Sam.

He began with a free program called Aseprite to design the art and animations for the main character, Spacepants guy, and the space caterpillar that’s his enemy. After that, he tested various controls schemes, finally nailing the beautifully simple two-button method that made the final game. Then came a lot of tweaking of movement speed and jumping heights and the addition of other enemies, all while using GameMaker: Studio “for the coding and making the things work.”

In total, it took Sam two months to create and test the game — with a little help from his dad when he got stuck — and he’s continuing to support it with updates based on feedback.

Game design lecturer Sean Oxspring recently called Spacepants “The Dark Souls of infinite runners,” referencing the brutally tough action role-playing game from publisher Bandai Namco. But this wasn’t an intentional part of the design. “I wasn’t trying to make it hard when I made it,” Sam told me. He did admit, however, to taking some inspiration from Super Hexagon, the notoriously tricky twitch-action game by Irish developer Terry Cavanagh.

A gaming education

Sam’s family took him out of school about three years ago. It was a tough call to make, but they decided it was their only option.

Unlike his two brothers, Sam had really been struggling with school life. He explained that he’d had difficulty keeping attention and found school “very difficult to cope with.”

“I fell asleep in class at points,” said Sam. “Eventually, I just started hiding under the table a lot of the time.”

Above: Sam has been home-schooled for nearly three years.

Taking Sam out of school wasn’t difficult in terms of paperwork and bureaucracy. All it took was was for the Smith family to complete a single-sheet form, assuring the authorities that they would look after Sam and give him an education.

What was difficult was adjusting family life to make sure that Sam had someone to look after and educate him.

In the U.K., where home education is still relatively rare, home-schooled children have no set curriculum to follow; parents just need to provide an education suitable for their child’s age, ability, and aptitude. And while most local education authorities in the U.K. make contact with parents of home-schooled children once a year, they have no statutory requirement to do so.

At first, Sam had a range of people to keep him learning at home. “I had a tutor come round to teach me art for a while,” he told me. “I was also taught geography by my mum, science by my [grandma], and math by my grandad.”

Fast-forward three years, and Sam is now predominantly learning by making games. “I pretty much learn things every day by being around my family and being around other people and with the Internet,” he told me. “But I am spending a lot of my time figuring out things and making games. You learn things through that as well.”

I asked Sam’s dad, who was in the background during our chat, if he was confident that crafting games would give Sam the education he needs. He joked that we’d find out, adding that games are, in his opinion, the best learning tools for humans. He pointed me to recent comments by entrepreneur and Eidos life president Ian Livingstone, who says that playing and making games are great ways for children to learn and that schools should change the way they work to reflect this.

Success

Sam had a small goal when he released Spacepants on iOS back in May. “I’m too young to have a job,” he told me, “so I thought I’d see if I can get £5.”

Above: Sam has bought Mario Kart 8 with some of his Spacepants earnings.

He’s now smashed that goal, making enough money to buy his younger brother a PlayStation 4 and giving his older brother a gaming fund to spend how he wants. As for Sam, he bought Mario Kart 8 for the Wii U “so I could shoot red shells at my brothers.”

The level of recognition that Spacepants has got has clearly blown Sam away. “It’s quite amazing to think how many people have discovered SpacePants,” he told me. “According to the leaderboards, there are over 1,000 people playing,” he added. “Even my score has been beaten!”

And, looking at the leaderboards, who is better at it — Android or iOS players? “Android players, it would seem,” he said.

View All

Article source: http://venturebeat.com/2014/07/26/the-12-year-old-boy-who-makes-games/

Jul 272014
 

Peter Kennaugh won gold for Great Britain at the London Olympics in the cycling team pursuit, but for the 25-year-old, Saturday’s silver at the Commonwealth Games in Glasgow still felt “pretty special”.

Kennaugh rides for Team Sky and, as the current British road race champion, might have felt almost as aggrieved as Sir Bradley Wiggins at being excluded from this year’s Tour de France squad. Sky’s loss, however, is the Isle of Man’s gain – the 25-year-old hails from Douglas, and his 40km points race Commonwealth medal took the total won by the island since its 1958 Games debut to 11.

“It’s different to the Olympics,” Kennaugh said after the race. “The Commonwealth Games are bigger than the Olympics in the Isle of Man. I’m just happy I can do it for them and put a smile on their faces.”

The team’s highest profile competitor since Mark Cavendish’s injury forced him to withdraw, Kennaugh will be hoping to extend his medal tally further with next Sunday’s road race.

Thanks to the quirks of history at the Games the British Isles are permitted to field seven home teams, with the Isle of Man, Jersey and Guernsey sending individual delegations alongside Northern Ireland, Wales, Scotland and England.

For the supporters of the various teams of the British Isles, wrapped in flags that provide an ideal opportunity to play the game of “name that country”, the games offer a rare opportunity to celebrate their homeland at an elite sporting event. “I’m from Jersey first and British second,” said Cathy Morling from St Helier, her shoulders draped with the island’s flag – white with a red saltire and a shield of three leopards. She and her husband and two sons had been at Celtic Park to witness the enormous roar as the island’s delegation – the biggest since its first appearance 56 years ago – was announced on the eve of competition, and were hoping for success in the badminton courts at the Emirates arena.

“I think the very fact that we’re here as Jersey is great,” said Morling, “the very fact that we saw our tiny little island going into the ground in the Opening Ceremony. If we won a medal that would be just fantastic.”

For her sporty sons, the games offer additional inspiration; Columba, 12, is a keen middle distance runner who trains at the same club as Jersey shotputter Zane Duquemin, while nine-year-old Ronan has competed for his island in fencing at the British youth championships: “Once you’re into the top three in Jersey you’re catapulted into the national fray.”

The opportunity to compete separately has thrown up some quirks into the competitive schedules – a Jersey v England badminton contest on Friday was being billed by some as “England v Old England”, since both Mariana Agathangelou and Mark Constable, playing for Jersey, are former England internationals who had competed alongside their opponents at previous events (“I first started playing badminton in Jersey and grew up there,” said Agathangelou, “so it’s nice to come back. It’s nice to have Jersey on your back again.”)

But for the smaller nations themselves, while the ambitions of most of their athletes may be modest, the value of the Commonwealths to their athletes is immense, according to Chris Till, a team manager with the Isle of Man squad.

“We have some first timers, some very young athletes. Some of them will have gone to national championships but never competed in front of a crowd this size. The level they compete at here is all about bettering their own standards – getting the experience as a spring board for other competitions.”

“This is the best prepared team we have ever had, but the logistics of having a population of 65,000 means most of our athletes would be struggling to compete at the very highest level,” said Graham Chester, operations director for the Guernsey Sports Commission. “You’re really looking at personal bests, island records.”

The value of the Games is not only in giving athletes the chance to compete at elite level, but in exciting fans in the countries of the UK. London 2012 may have been a much bigger deal than Glasgow 2014 in parts of Britain, but Scotland has been overjoyed by the nation’s record-breaking medal tally so far, while Welsh gold medal wins in gymnastics and judo also caused excitement and pride back home. Northern Ireland has so far claimed a solitary bronze in judo.

Is it really fair, all the same, for the British Isles to field seven separateteams, meaning, in the words of Mike Hooper, the chief executive of the Commonwealth Games Federation, “this is like a home games for all of the home nations”? There are 53 countries in the Commonwealth and 71 nations and territories competing in the games, a discrepancy explained by “precedent and history”, according to the federation’s head of communications, Peter Murphy. “It’s a bit like the Commonwealth itself.”

There are other examples: Norfolk Island, competing separately at the games, is part of the commonwealth of Australia, while tiny Nieu is a self-governing island whose residents are New Zealand citizens. And as residents of Jersey, Guernsey and the Isle of Man will stress, they are not part of the UK or Great Britain in any case. The other Channel Islands of Alderney, Sark and Herm are too small to have independent affiliated commonwealth games federations.

Such discrepancies undoubtedly add to the colour of the games, but at a time when Scots are considering making their political, not just sporting separation from the UK, they have sparked discussion – among competitors and officials in the athletes’ village, according to Chester, as well as fans and commentators – over how Glasgow’s games may affect September’s independence vote.

Jacqui Caldwell and her niece Linsay Shields had attended the Olympics draped in Team GB flags; at the Commonwealth SECC venue they had swapped them for large blue saltires. These “amazing” games could sway the vote, Caldwell thought: “I think Glasgow as a whole, Scotland as a whole is on such a high, they will see themselves as being able to stage this amazing event, so why would we not be able to carry off independence?”

Others, suggest that the overwhelmingly warm reception from the Scottish crowds for competitors of all the home nations could be indicative of precisely the opposite effect.

There is a limit to the degree of independent representation even the Commonwealth Games would tolerate, according to Murphy.

“There are some very passionate people in Cornwall who would like Cornwall to have its own team, and we have occasionally had correspondence with them. But the reality is it is not a separate nation and there isn’t any call for its inclusion from the world of sport.”

Article source: http://www.theguardian.com/sport/2014/jul/27/commonwealth-games-scotland-independence-british-isles

Jul 272014
 

Peter Kennaugh won gold for Great Britain at the London Olympics in the cycling team pursuit, but for the 25-year-old, Saturday’s silver at the Commonwealth Games in Glasgow still felt “pretty special”.

Kennaugh rides for Team Sky and, as the current British road race champion, might have felt almost as aggrieved as Sir Bradley Wiggins at being excluded from this year’s Tour de France squad. Sky’s loss, however, is the Isle of Man’s gain – the 25-year-old hails from Douglas, and his 40km points race Commonwealth medal took the total won by the island since its 1958 Games debut to 11.

“It’s different to the Olympics,” Kennaugh said after the race. “The Commonwealth Games are bigger than the Olympics in the Isle of Man. I’m just happy I can do it for them and put a smile on their faces.”

The team’s highest profile competitor since Mark Cavendish’s injury forced him to withdraw, Kennaugh will be hoping to extend his medal tally further with next Sunday’s road race.

Thanks to the quirks of history at the Games the British Isles are permitted to field seven home teams, with the Isle of Man, Jersey and Guernsey sending individual delegations alongside Northern Ireland, Wales, Scotland and England.

For the supporters of the various teams of the British Isles, wrapped in flags that provide an ideal opportunity to play the game of “name that country”, the games offer a rare opportunity to celebrate their homeland at an elite sporting event. “I’m from Jersey first and British second,” said Cathy Morling from St Helier, her shoulders draped with the island’s flag – white with a red saltire and a shield of three leopards. She and her husband and two sons had been at Celtic Park to witness the enormous roar as the island’s delegation – the biggest since its first appearance 56 years ago – was announced on the eve of competition, and were hoping for success in the badminton courts at the Emirates arena.

“I think the very fact that we’re here as Jersey is great,” said Morling, “the very fact that we saw our tiny little island going into the ground in the Opening Ceremony. If we won a medal that would be just fantastic.”

For her sporty sons, the games offer additional inspiration; Columba, 12, is a keen middle distance runner who trains at the same club as Jersey shotputter Zane Duquemin, while nine-year-old Ronan has competed for his island in fencing at the British youth championships: “Once you’re into the top three in Jersey you’re catapulted into the national fray.”

The opportunity to compete separately has thrown up some quirks into the competitive schedules – a Jersey v England badminton contest on Friday was being billed by some as “England v Old England”, since both Mariana Agathangelou and Mark Constable, playing for Jersey, are former England internationals who had competed alongside their opponents at previous events (“I first started playing badminton in Jersey and grew up there,” said Agathangelou, “so it’s nice to come back. It’s nice to have Jersey on your back again.”)

But for the smaller nations themselves, while the ambitions of most of their athletes may be modest, the value of the Commonwealths to their athletes is immense, according to Chris Till, a team manager with the Isle of Man squad.

“We have some first timers, some very young athletes. Some of them will have gone to national championships but never competed in front of a crowd this size. The level they compete at here is all about bettering their own standards – getting the experience as a spring board for other competitions.”

“This is the best prepared team we have ever had, but the logistics of having a population of 65,000 means most of our athletes would be struggling to compete at the very highest level,” said Graham Chester, operations director for the Guernsey Sports Commission. “You’re really looking at personal bests, island records.”

The value of the Games is not only in giving athletes the chance to compete at elite level, but in exciting fans in the countries of the UK. London 2012 may have been a much bigger deal than Glasgow 2014 in parts of Britain, but Scotland has been overjoyed by the nation’s record-breaking medal tally so far, while Welsh gold medal wins in gymnastics and judo also caused excitement and pride back home. Northern Ireland has so far claimed a solitary bronze in judo.

Is it really fair, all the same, for the British Isles to field seven separateteams, meaning, in the words of Mike Hooper, the chief executive of the Commonwealth Games Federation, “this is like a home games for all of the home nations”? There are 53 countries in the Commonwealth and 71 nations and territories competing in the games, a discrepancy explained by “precedent and history”, according to the federation’s head of communications, Peter Murphy. “It’s a bit like the Commonwealth itself.”

There are other examples: Norfolk Island, competing separately at the games, is part of the commonwealth of Australia, while tiny Nieu is a self-governing island whose residents are New Zealand citizens. And as residents of Jersey, Guernsey and the Isle of Man will stress, they are not part of the UK or Great Britain in any case. The other Channel Islands of Alderney, Sark and Herm are too small to have independent affiliated commonwealth games federations.

Such discrepancies undoubtedly add to the colour of the games, but at a time when Scots are considering making their political, not just sporting separation from the UK, they have sparked discussion – among competitors and officials in the athletes’ village, according to Chester, as well as fans and commentators – over how Glasgow’s games may affect September’s independence vote.

Jacqui Caldwell and her niece Linsay Shields had attended the Olympics draped in Team GB flags; at the Commonwealth SECC venue they had swapped them for large blue saltires. These “amazing” games could sway the vote, Caldwell thought: “I think Glasgow as a whole, Scotland as a whole is on such a high, they will see themselves as being able to stage this amazing event, so why would we not be able to carry off independence?”

Others, suggest that the overwhelmingly warm reception from the Scottish crowds for competitors of all the home nations could be indicative of precisely the opposite effect.

There is a limit to the degree of independent representation even the Commonwealth Games would tolerate, according to Murphy.

“There are some very passionate people in Cornwall who would like Cornwall to have its own team, and we have occasionally had correspondence with them. But the reality is it is not a separate nation and there isn’t any call for its inclusion from the world of sport.”

Article source: http://www.theguardian.com/sport/2014/jul/27/commonwealth-games-scotland-independence-british-isles

Jul 272014
 

Sam Smith is a 12-year-old game developer. That’s rather young, sure, but that’s not even the strangest part.

Sam makes games instead of going to school.

Spacepants is Sam’s latest game, available for $1 on iOS and Android devices. It’s a brutally tough “endless runner” — like Jetpack Joyride or Flappy Bird — set in a single room, which sees you avoiding lasers, space caterpillars, and other nasties for as long as you can while constantly moving.

My Spacepants record was 75.73 seconds when I spoke to Sam last week — although I’ve beaten it since — and he seemed reasonably impressed with my efforts. “It’s above average,” he told me enthusiastically, before sharing some background on his journey into game development.

Making Spacepants

Sam has been making games from his home in the south of England for “about a year.” He started out playing around with a programming language called Small Basic, a simplified version of Visual Basic, mostly making text-based adventures that are all words and no graphics.

It was Sam’s dad who introduced him to GameMaker: Studio, the creative resource suitable for programming novices that Sam used to build Spacepants. “He’s a programmer himself,” Sam told me. “He actually introduced me to how to make a game and how to read the [Game Maker] manual.”

As with many great ideas, Spacepants started out with a simple concept. “I wanted to make a game where you could walk up walls because walking up walls is fun,” said Sam.

He began with a free program called Aseprite to design the art and animations for the main character, Spacepants guy, and the space caterpillar that’s his enemy. After that, he tested various controls schemes, finally nailing the beautifully simple two-button method that made the final game. Then came a lot of tweaking of movement speed and jumping heights and the addition of other enemies, all while using GameMaker: Studio “for the coding and making the things work.”

In total, it took Sam two months to create and test the game — with a little help from his dad when he got stuck — and he’s continuing to support it with updates based on feedback.

Game design lecturer Sean Oxspring recently called Spacepants “The Dark Souls of infinite runners,” referencing the brutally tough action role-playing game from publisher Bandai Namco. But this wasn’t an intentional part of the design. “I wasn’t trying to make it hard when I made it,” Sam told me. He did admit, however, to taking some inspiration from Super Hexagon, the notoriously tricky twitch-action game by Irish developer Terry Cavanagh.

A gaming education

Sam’s family took him out of school about three years ago. It was a tough call to make, but they decided it was their only option.

Unlike his two brothers, Sam had really been struggling with school life. He explained that he’d had difficulty keeping attention and found school “very difficult to cope with.”

“I fell asleep in class at points,” said Sam. “Eventually, I just started hiding under the table a lot of the time.”

Above: Sam has been home-schooled for nearly three years.

Taking Sam out of school wasn’t difficult in terms of paperwork and bureaucracy. All it took was was for the Smith family to complete a single-sheet form, assuring the authorities that they would look after Sam and give him an education.

What was difficult was adjusting family life to make sure that Sam had someone to look after and educate him.

In the U.K., where home education is still relatively rare, home-schooled children have no set curriculum to follow; parents just need to provide an education suitable for their child’s age, ability, and aptitude. And while most local education authorities in the U.K. make contact with parents of home-schooled children once a year, they have no statutory requirement to do so.

At first, Sam had a range of people to keep him learning at home. “I had a tutor come round to teach me art for a while,” he told me. “I was also taught geography by my mum, science by my [grandma], and math by my grandad.”

Fast-forward three years, and Sam is now predominantly learning by making games. “I pretty much learn things every day by being around my family and being around other people and with the Internet,” he told me. “But I am spending a lot of my time figuring out things and making games. You learn things through that as well.”

I asked Sam’s dad, who was in the background during our chat, if he was confident that crafting games would give Sam the education he needs. He joked that we’d find out, adding that games are, in his opinion, the best learning tools for humans. He pointed me to recent comments by entrepreneur and Eidos life president Ian Livingstone, who says that playing and making games are great ways for children to learn and that schools should change the way they work to reflect this.

Success

Sam had a small goal when he released Spacepants on iOS back in May. “I’m too young to have a job,” he told me, “so I thought I’d see if I can get £5.”

Above: Sam has bought Mario Kart 8 with some of his Spacepants earnings.

He’s now smashed that goal, making enough money to buy his younger brother a PlayStation 4 and giving his older brother a gaming fund to spend how he wants. As for Sam, he bought Mario Kart 8 for the Wii U “so I could shoot red shells at my brothers.”

The level of recognition that Spacepants has got has clearly blown Sam away. “It’s quite amazing to think how many people have discovered SpacePants,” he told me. “According to the leaderboards, there are over 1,000 people playing,” he added. “Even my score has been beaten!”

And, looking at the leaderboards, who is better at it — Android or iOS players? “Android players, it would seem,” he said.

View All

Article source: http://venturebeat.com/2014/07/26/the-12-year-old-boy-who-makes-games/

Jul 272014
 

Time for more sludge from our comments queue, and we’ll have you know it was no easy task hosing off our keyboard after this visit. First up, a note from “NasalVacuum,” who we assume must be former Florida Rep. Trey Radel. NasalVacuum was not impressed with our little mommyblog, recipe trading post, and clopfic nexus; and was particularly disappointed by our story last week about the clinical psychologist who’s obsessed with Sandra Fluke’s totalitarian vagina. Problem is, it just wasn’t FUNNY. Here is NasalVacuum’s objective assessment:

Yikes! This is what passes for writing on Wonkette? Just awful. The writer might want to look at the Daily Rash and learn a few things about satire and humor. This tripe was painful to read and I didn’t even get to the end without screaming. But I’m a nice person so here’s a link to real satire and I wish you the best. No, really.

The email closed with a link to hilarious conservative fake-news site The Daily Rash, whose top story right now is (hope you’re sitting down) this bit of inspired whimsy: “Al Qaeda Jihad Magazine ‘Inspire’ Publishes Its First Swimsuit Issue.” Get it? It’s funny, ’cause radical Muslims make ladies wear burqas!

The linked satire also imagines Sandra Fluke protesting the imaginary al Qaeda swimsuit issue and shouting

“You tell your jihadist it’s a two way street, fella. If you wanna crawl on my body like a maggot on a piece of tainted meat, you better provide me free birth control, abortions and equal pay in the boardroom. Only then will shenanigans be a possible consideration in the bedroom.”

Now THAT, folks, is how you do satire about that slut Sandra Fluke! Four minutes after pointing us to The Daily Rash (which doesn’t actually update daily — that is a humorous reversal of expectations, too), Nasal Vacuum sent a sober follow-up chastisement:

I just got the message that my comment must be approved before its posted. Which of course means it will never be posted. I can imagine the “conference room” at Wonkette, all the meat puppets with their gallon sized Starbucks cups …. each one thinking that they’ve “made it” in the progressive world of no-talent foot soldiers. Oh yeah!

Hahaha, “conference room”! You have no idea, former Rep. Radel! We actually work at home and brew our own free-trade coffee, grown by syndicalist lesbians on a Nicaraguan commune and taken to market in a Prius modified to run on organic soy oil. On the other hand, we posted your comment far more prominently than if we’d just approved it, so we guess you showed us!

Our piece on the Ladies’ Auxiliary of the Men’s Rights Movement was definitely not appreciated by Battlestar Galactica fan “pegasusactual,” who wants us to know that we are just terrible for making fun of the poor oppressed MRAs, because feminism is the WRONG TOOL to address rape. This is because feminists hate men:

You’re not the good guys. 1 in 6 males is sexually abused before age 18. https://1in6.org/the-1-in-6-statistic/ 1 in 5 males is sexually assaulted. http://www.slate.com/articles/double_x/doublex/20… As many as 1 in 3 lesbians may be sexually assaulted by another lesbian. http://www.curvemag.com/Curve-Magazine/Web-Articl… Feminists blame the patriarchy for rape. Its supposed to be a tool of oppression that men use to subjugate them so they perpetuate they idea that rape is something men do to women and not something women do to women or men. If a male rape victim wants to march in a take back the night rally then too bad. Its a “safe space for women”. Because to them rape is about women.

The full message is much longer, but in a similar vein. Obviously, the solution is not to broaden discussions of sexual assault to include all victims, but instead for feminists to shut up because feminism just blames men for everything, when in fact rape is just something that everybody does, as several carefully-cherry-picked statistics prove!

Our piece on how Ronald Reagan was much manlier than Barack Obama in his manly response to an airliner getting shot down (except for the time America shot one down) got a couple of attempted comments from “dielectric1,” who appears to me a Hegelian electrician. They did not care for our partisan lies, and said so in two comments that we quote in their entirety:

  • So this is where all the liberal trolls meet on the internet… Nothin but a bunch of 0bbbbaaaaaaammaaaaaa sheeple
  • You wouldn’t know a “fact” if it punched you in the head

Boy, did they ever set us straight!

The same piece also inspired “apstore12″ to ask a very important question to prove that we were merely stirring up trouble by mentioning the 1988 shooting down of an Iranian airliner by the USS Vincennes:

“Strangely unmentioned by either Fox or Media Matters was that one time in 1988 when America shot down an Iranian airliner, killing 290 people.” Can I ask what media outlet was mentioning it??? I’m just getting the feeling more and more this is just a pander story for people to conjure up more hate. Seems to be working by the looks of the comments.

What media outlets mentioned it? Besides the Washington Post, which we linked to in our article itself, quite a few! Heck, a person could even look that up!

Our piece about the Shasta County Board of Supervisors’ shortsighted attempt to placate believers in “chemtrails” by giving them a hearing wasn’t well-received by a couple of readers, who just wanted us to know that we need to be a lot more open-minded when it comes to pseudoscientific wackaloon conspiracy theories. “CUSpacecowboy” (who is henceforth banned from liking Cowboy Bebop anymore, ever), just wants us to know that there are a lot of strange things out there, so chemtrails are probably real, QED:

The gov’t doing chemtrails really isn’t a stretch if you look back in history, in 1994 in Oakville, Washington a jello like blob substance fell from the sky that contained human white corpusles, a iron like substance, and some virulant bacteria that has made people sick when touched — Black Helicopters were sighted in the Oakville area before rain storms brought the fall of the unknown substance, and in the 1950’s and 60’s the CIA secretly dosed unwitting Americans with LSD to test the effects -– in one instance they slipped it into a U.S. Marshal’s drink and he held up a San Francisco bar and killed someone while high on acid that he didn’t know he took, just look up the MK-ULTRA program. And yes these are documented cases not just conspiracy cases.

Do your own research, sheeple! It is a scary and dangerous world out there, and the Government is hiding their unspeakable crimes. Look to the skies! (But wear swim goggles.)

We also heard from “Windy,” who knows that since “cloud seeding” is real, then obviously so are chemtrails, duh, but “global warming” is totes fake, because a website says so:

For a moment, we wondered if Windy was trying to sell us some silver oxide, but eventually we figured out that she or he thinks that it must be what the chemtrail planes are spraying, since the chemical supply website they link to three times lists these uses for silver oxide:

As a Carbon Dioxide Scrubber:
Nuclear Submarines use Silver Oxide to scrub Carbon Dioxide from their air.
The International Space Station uses Silver Oxide to scrub Carbon Dioxide from their air.
The Space Shuttle uses Silver Oxide to scrub Carbon Dioxide from their air.

Science puzzle question! What is the difference between those three locations and the Great Big Atmosphere? We will let you puzzle that one out for yourselves! Windy’s deep science thinking reminds us of the kid at a presentation on AIDS who reasoned that if intravenous drug users are urged to clean their works with a bleach solution, then maybe doctors should inject AIDS patients with bleach, since it kills the virus. Then again, the kid was 13 and blushed when the presenter explained the flaw in her reasoning, while Windy is presumably an adult who should be able to recognize the difference between “a small airtight area” and “Earth’s entire goddamn atmosphere.”

If you need an example of why we have rules for commenting radicals, please see this note from “Joefreedomfries,” who is welcome to comment at Wonket in the future, but not like this. In response to the open carry maroons in Dealy Plaza, Joefreedomfries wrote,

I can’t believe I am writing this, but it would be such a delicious irony to have some sniper pop this clown’s crown open like a cantaloupe while he is insisting that NOONE will ever take his guns away. Maybe best from his cold dead hand. I don’t advocate violence or wish ill on anyone, including these Nobel nominees, but to catch that on a modern day Zapruder almost calls for a one time exemption

Actually, no. We don’t do that. The only exploding heads we want to see in our comments are the ones whose owners can’t handle watching Scanners.

And finally, some good old You-Need-To Write-About-What-I-Think-Is-Important-Or-You’re-Bad-Progressives shaming from “cheriezees,” who tweeted or emailed Yr Editrix directly, and also left this comment on an unrelated post by Rebecca to shame us — or her, specifically — into writing a blog that cheriezees would write, not the blog that we actually do write:

Forgive me for contacting you here. I promise it will be the last time I bother you. I know fuck all about what you think about Israel because you’ve said fuck all about what you think about Israel. Of course you’re free to think whatever you want, but whatever it is, you’ve chosen not to say anything, not to make fun of the media, not to make fun of right-wingers on this issue, not to make fun of Netanyahu. So I can only conclude that you either aren’t progressive on this issue, or you don’t care enough to say dick about it. I’m one of those stupid liberals who thinks if you know a horrible crime is being committed, and you have a huge platform, you’re just a smidge complicit if you say nothing. As I said, it makes me sad, and that’s it. It makes me sad. I included a link to Jewish Voice for Peace almost as an afterthought because I realize it’s a difficult issue for a lot of Jews, and I sympathize with that. I thought you might feel better or something that you wouldn’t be alone. I don’t know what I thought. I barely knew for sure if you were Jewish. I grew up in one of the flyovers, I’m not that familiar with Jewish names. I thought probably, but I wasn’t sure. I definitely would have said the exact same thing to you if you weren’t, I just wouldn’t have included the link

Note also the deft deployment of Ethnic Solidarity, too: “What kind of Jew are you, if you are even a Jew at all, you?” While Yr Doktor Zoom is neither Rebecca nor Jewish, we are pleased to summarize our best recollection of the chatcave conversation on this very topic: We’re not covering it because it’s not fucking funny and the political leaders on both sides are fucking terrible (though not equally armed with horrible weapons), as are lots of both populations, not that anyone deserves to be blown up. In any case, we are sorry that our complicity makes you sad. If only we were to write something passionate or snarky about Gaza, we’d probably be able to make the bombing stop. You want jaded? There’s jaded for you. We are firmly on the “Don’t blow up children” side, but when it comes to the Israel/Palestine conflict, we also tend to think Kurt Vonnegut had it right on the Role of the Artist in Responding to Vietnam: The artists, like coal-mine canaries, all “chirped and keeled over. But it made no difference whatsoever. Nobody important cared.” On the other hand, maybe we can help keep some Detroit residents’ water on. So it goes.

Article source: http://wonkette.com/555263/deleted-comments-of-the-day-you-guys-arent-funny-check-out-some-funny-conservative-satire